Changing U.S. political environment and amphibians

Sorry it has been a long time since I last wrote. Recently I have been trying to understand this last U.S. election results, and why everything that I believed about America has been turned on its head. One of the many questions that has been going through my head is this: what does the new presidency mean for amphibians and the people who study them?

If you live in another country, hopefully you won’t be affected by this transition. If you live in the U.S. or one of its territories, I hope that all of the good work to conserve the environment that was done under previous government administration will endure. Save the Frogs has already said that they will continue their work as usual, no matter what the election results.

Now here are some photos of cute tropical frogs to brighten the mood.

Agalychnis annae at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica

Agalychnis saltator at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica

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Red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) pair in amplexus at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica

Red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) revealing nictitating membrane.

Red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) revealing nictitating membrane.

I think this is an asian horned frog from the Georgia Aquarium (not sure on the species)

I think this is an Asian horned frog from the Georgia Aquarium (not sure on the species). He is pretty disgusted with the election results.

Two pairs of túngara frogs whipping up foam nests while on display. As long as they have water, these guys will breed anywhere!

Two pairs of túngara frogs whipping up foam nests to deposit their eggs in.

Fitzinger's Robber Frog (Craugastor fitzingeri) from Panama.

Fitzinger’s Robber Frog (Craugastor fitzingeri) from Panama.

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